A 72-hour ultimatum to Governor Ifeanyi Okowa of Delta State to reverse the ban on open grazing is not from Miyetti Allah Cattle Breeders Association of Nigeria (MACBAN) says its national secretary, Othman Ngelzarma.

The ultimatum printed and posted across the state on Sunday threatened attacks on Asaba, the state capital and Agbor area of the state should Mr. Ifeanyi fail to comply with their demand.

“We hereby demand the Governor of Delta State to immediately withdraw his earlier stand on the call to ban open grazing in 17 regions (referring to 17 southern states) in not less than 72 hours from the above date, and also withdraw his position as the leading voice for the governors,” part of the letter by the unpopular group read.

The Fulani Jihadist Warning is in reaction to the decision of 17 Southern state governors last month banning pastoralists from engaging in open grazing which is said to be the major source of insecurity and threat to food security.

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Mr Ngelzarma, in an interview on Channels TV on Monday, said although his group shares similar opinion with the unknown fulani group threatening fire and brimstone, it knows nothing about the threat.

The MACBAN chieftain also charged Northern state governors to man up and engage their southern counterpart to ensure peace.

“Such statement that comes from faceless unknown groups shouldn’t be given any serious consideration. I believe this statement must be coming from mischief makers, People who are out to tarnish the image of the Fulanis and pastoralists,” Ngelzarma said.

“It is because of such negative profiling by the media that makes us believe that the anti-open grazing laws being intended to be promulgated by the southern states are not laws stopping open grazing, but I believe these laws are laws against Fulanis living in the southern part of the country.

“The Northern governors must be up and doing and they must also begin to open discussions with their southern counterparts for them to put their heads together and come up with a solution that can work for both the north and the south.

“Respecting the fundamental human rights of the pastoralists as citizens. Their right to movement, their right to pray, their right to trade, their right to liberty,” he added.

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